Bug Prentice


New demo: The Bucket
April 29, 2011, 2:12 pm
Filed under: Downloads, Musical

My latest demo combines my usual guitar/vocal schtick with programmed drums and synths.

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The MusicInOxford Sessions
October 31, 2010, 4:58 pm
Filed under: Downloads, Musical | Tags: , , , , , , ,

My session for MusicInOxford is online now. I played four songs all on my lonesome, including a cover of Squeeze Bees by Ivor Cutler. It’s free to download, so stick it in your ears.



The Stanton-Walsh Rule: Don’t Be Shy

The Stanton-Walsh Rule strikes again. This time it’s Don’t Be Shy, as written and performed by Cat Stevens for the 1971 film Harold and Maude. The electronic backing track was made with Renoise, fact fans.



New track: Nicholas Ray

Bug Prentice are proud to present a brand new demo. It sounds like this:

You can download Nicholas Ray for free, in a variety of formats, on our bandcamp page.



The Stanton-Walsh Rule: Everyone Says I Love You

The Stanton-Walsh Rule is my new side-project, dedicated to covering songs from classic films. It’s named after Roger Ebert’s theory that “no movie featuring either Harry Dean Stanton or M. Emmet Walsh in a supporting role can be altogether bad.”

Having tackled Rita Hayworth’s signature tune, I set my sights on the Marx Brothers. Everyone Says I Love You was originally sung by Zeppo Marx in the 1932 film Horse Feathers. Throughout the film, variations are performed by Chico, Harpo and Groucho.





New Demo: Put the Blame on Mame

I spend this afternoon recording a little demo of Put the Blame on Mame, a song made famous by Rita Hayworth in the 1946 film noir Gilda.

Put the Blame on Mame by Bug Prentice

After recording, the first thing I saw was the sad news of Harvey Pekar’s death. RIP, you grumpy jazz-fiend bastard.



New demo: Just Do Anything?
June 14, 2010, 12:42 pm
Filed under: Downloads, Musical | Tags: , , , ,

Just Do Anything?
a demo by Ally

Many of my recent songwriting efforts have been inspired by Hollywood, from Woody Allen to Nicholas Ray. This one is a short, silly tribute to the great Orson Welles. Mahh, the French…

Note: I recommend downloading the MP3, the streaming version sounds a little odd to me.